Faith Journal

Is God For Real?

God is in the Belly www.herviewfromhome.com
Written by Amye Archer

Last night it was my husband’s turn to take our eight-year-old twin daughters to bed. In recent years, our bedtime routine has been downgraded from a virtual vaudeville act with singing, and dancing, to a leisurely tuck-in full of questions ranging anywhere from “Can we paint our room black?” (No.) to “Is God real?” (Um???) Last night, the latter happened, and had it been me in the room, had I been the one to receive the God question, I might have been okay with what happened. But it was not me. And I was not alright.

I was born on a Sunday, and we all missed mass that day.

When my daughters were born, we made the decision to not have them baptized. They’ve never stepped foot in a church, and up until the age of five they believed our local churches to be mystical castles. They’ve heard about religion from grandparents and various community members, but they’ve never been formally instructed by any stretch of the imagination. Then, at the age of four, my grandmother decided to introduce them to Ba, my long-dead grandfather. And with that came heaven, because how could I look at their faces and tell them that Ba was simply no more? Because how could I believe that myself? Because how could I allow them to be so jaded at four years old that they believe nothing but blackness waits for them at the end of this light we call life? Because it was 2:30 on a Monday and I was in a hurry to shuttle them from school to piano and to make dinner and do homework in between. And because heaven was easy.

My grandmother wrapped a rosary around her wrist and prayed for my grandfather’s return. I hung rosaries from my preteen neck and pretended to be Madonna.

When I was twelve, I asked my father if I could “drop out” of my Roman Catholic instruction. He sat on the edge of my bed with particles of light in the sunbeams around him. I told him I didn’t believe in God, or heaven, or Jesus, or any of it. He told me faith is walking off a cliff and knowing someone will be there to catch you. No one has ever been there to catch me.

Father Penn told my second-grade Sunday school class that Satan was making us yawn during his sermon, and that we should resist Satan and all of his ignorance by staying awake.

When I found out about the children killed at Sandy Hook Elementary, the children who were exactly the same age as my girls, I called my mother with hysteria in my voice. I don’t know what to do with this hurt, I sobbed. I mourned for months. I would have given anything for a jar marked ‘FAITH’ in which to pour that pain.

The most religious person I know is my grandmother, who believes with equal conviction that a Scorpio rising sign has more of an influence on your physical appearance than genetics.

Before my girls were born, I swore that as a mother I would “breastfeed, use cloth diapers, and smile a lot.” None of those things happened. I also swore that I would debunk the Santa Claus myth early, not spend money on Christmas presents, never let my kids have soda, and be painstakingly honest most of the time. I just finished ordering two Kindle Fires to place under our tree from Santa, and I’m pretty sure one of my daughters is hooked on Pepsi. And now, they think their great-grandfather is walking around on a cloud somewhere in the sky. And it isn’t that horrible after all, because I’d like to think he’s there too.

There are no stupid questions, only stupid answers.

What happened last night was the inevitable. “The girls asked if God is real,” my husband said.
Me: And?
Him: And what? I told them that I don’t believe in God.
Me: And what did they say?
Him: They said they don’t either.
And an incredible sadness welled up inside my belly, where they once lived, where I rubbed them, and sang to them, and prayed to God for them.

About the author

Amye Archer

Amye Archer holds an MFA in Creative Writing. She is the author of https://www.amazon.com/Fat-Girl-Skinny-Amye-Archer-ebook/dp/B01BA901WG/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8, a memoir about weight-ing. Amye writes regularly for Feminine Collective and blogs at https://thefatgirlblog.com/. She lives online at https://www.amyearcher.com/. She tweets from @amyearcher. She teaches writing at the University of Scranton.

  • sherry

    Thank you for this honest post. I think most of us have asked ourselves that same question…is God real? I know I did. I grew up in church but left the church after my dad passed away for about 8 years in my twenties.

  • Marnie

    I also appreciate your honesty. Have you read “Mere Christianity” by CS Lewis? It’s a great starting point for a discussion of the existence of God. I went through a spiritual crisis a number of years back that I begged for God’s guidance through, and He did eventually lead me to a place of peace, though not at all how I would have expected. Your parents attempted, probably very imperfectly (as did mine) to give you the precious gift of faith. Don’t be afraid to search and ask hard questions. The struggle is worth it.