Featured Kids Uncategorized

Milk Jug Ghosts

Written by Dotti Gramke

Quick!!! You need to grab your kids and keep them busy for a little bit between the end of school and heading out to trick-or-treat or to that Halloween party!

This really easy project only takes a few minutes and will make the walkway to your front door super cute.

This is all you need:

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Yep. A milk jug (clean..or you will have a stinky project), a black marker and a little battery operated tealight. Make note, if you do not have a battery operated tealight, battery operated christmas lights work. So do little flashlights and glowsticks. Please, DO NOT use a real candle because your milk jug could melt. Be safe and use one of the suggested light sources.

For the next part, an adult should do this. Turn the jug around to the handle side, and make a square, like this:

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Next, cut it out. This is best accomplished by squeezing the jug a little and cutting a starting point. Remember how I said a CLEAN milk jug? If the kids clean it, remind them to use soap, then let it dry. Notice I had to rewash the jug, and it’s a little wet. Just a note: a hairdryer on low dries the milk jug really fast after that hole is cut. 

Then hand it over to your artists. Have them draw a ghost…happy, sad, scared, it doesn’t matter. Here is mine (not, I am not an artist)

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Now, put your light source in the back…and VIOLA! A super cute ghost! 

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Imagine if you had a bunch of these little guys lined up on your front steps, or sidewalk!

 

About the author

Dotti Gramke

Dotti was born and raised in Southwest Wyoming and moved to Nebraska after falling head-over-heels for a Nebraska boy in college; and married him. She is the mother of two beautiful girls. In the past, Dotti has worked as a reporter for two different Nebraska newspapers, as well as a freelance writer. She is an active photographer, and her art was shown in a gallery in Wyoming, in a display of Nebraska Photographers at the Hastings Museum and as the feature artist at the Minden Opera House. If you don’t see her with her camera or her family, you might find Dotti at home–chasing chickens and cows.