Faith Featured

You what?

Written by Sue Harrison

When Tish’s four-year-old granddaughter, Brya, came down with the stomach flu, they had a conversation that went something like this.

Brya: Grandma, I threw up.

Grandma Tish: Oh, Brya, I’m so sad for you.

Brya: Twice.

Grandma Tish: Sometimes that happens.

Brya: In YOUR bed.

Grandma Tish: Awwww… What?

I know that it’s horrible to be sick to your stomach, especially when you’re only four, but I have to admit that when my sister Tish relayed that conversation, I cracked up. You can feel the tension mounting until that final moment of revelation: All this happened to me, Grandma, AND it also happened in YOUR bed.

There’s nothing like that personal touch to bring home the reality of a bad situation.

A couple weeks ago, Jim, a close friend and cousin of ours, went through a very serious and scary heart surgery. I promised to pray for Jim, and my prayers were sincere and frequent. Then my husband and I visited Jim in the hospital. To see this dynamic and active person in a hospital bed, to see his family keeping vigil, lifted by their hope, and battered by their fear added  a whole new dimension to my prayers.

I know we all hate going through tough times, we hate seeing those we love go through tough times, but I also know this. Tough times soften my heart, increase my empathy, and elevate my prayers. Tough times have also helped me understand that Bible verse which perplexed me for many years. “Pray without ceasing.” (I Thessalonians 5:17 KJV)

How is it possible to pray without ceasing? Here’s what God has been revealing to me. You pray as if it’s happening to you. You pray as if you’re right there, seeing it, enduring it. As if that hospital bed is YOUR bed. As if the needles are in YOUR arm. As if the surgeon’s knife cut YOUR heart.

That kind of prayer, that’s the unceasing kind.

Photograph copyright, Logan Towsley, 2014. Used with permission.

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About the author

Sue Harrison

BIO: Novelist Sue Harrison is best known for her Alaska trilogies. Her novels, national and international bestsellers, have been published in more than 20 countries in 13 different languages. Her novel Mother Earth Father Sky was named by the American Library Association as a Best Books for Young Adults. Sue lives with her husband in Michigan, but has family here in Nebraska and love Nebraska’s rich history. She is currently writing romantic suspense for the inspirational market. Catch up with Sue on her website and blog – www.sueharrison.com .

4 Comments

  • I pray for friends and family but I am not a religious person. To me there is a difference. However, when I say to a friend that I will pray for them I sincerely mean it and to me, prayer without ceasing means that I constantly keep them in my heart and in my mind until the crisis passes. Then, I say a final prayer to thank God.

  • I think you have it exactly right, Angie. Religion isn’t necessarily relationship, and although I am religious in the sense that I attend church and sing in the choir, etc., the important thing is not all that “doing” it’s the relationship with God, which is beyond religion and so much more fulfilling. Your prayers are proof of your relationship, and your constant vigil is proof of the love in your heart!! Thank you for sharing.