So God Made a Mother Collection ➔

To the working mama who cries in her car after drop-off,

I was you just today. And boy did it sting. 

As a working mom, some days, drop-off is brutal. Some days I just want to march back into daycare and grab my little one, then head home to watch movies on the couch and eat fruit snacks. Some days I sit in my car for a few minutes to cry my eyeballs out before I start the morning transition from mom to corporate employee. Some days I call the school three times to make sure my little one is doing OK.

She always is. And eventually, so am I.

Thankfully, those gut-wrenching days are few and far between. And when they come, I let the work-life scale tip a little more in favor of family. 

RELATED: I’m an Exhausted Working Mom Who’s Ready to Lean Out, Not In

Working moms are a tough breed, with extreme abilities to compartmentalize, multi-task, and muster up the strength to live up to near-impossible standards. We pour our hearts into making the most of time and energy across the board, always keeping a tally of work versus home wins. We bring on the chaos and adventure while handling the inevitable scrutiny with grace. 

I love being a working mom. 

I know I’m in good company with others who meticulously plan each and every detail at home and at work. I know there are other women out there who go on special donut breakfasts before work and school to squeeze in a few extra happy minutes and hopefully, memories. 

And I know there are others who want to ugly cry in the parking lot of daycare, just like me. 

RELATED: I’m a Working Mom and it Works For Me

To that woman I say, you and I both know this moment, day, or season will pass. Cherish those good moments at work and at home because they make you who you arean incredible woman with superpowers . . . even if you don’t feel like it today.

Grab your coffee, call the school, and kick some serious butt today.

Christina Andrews

Christina Andrews is a working mom who spends her free time hanging with family and justifying In n Out for dinner.

I’m Tired of Working Like I Don’t Have Kids and Mothering Like I Don’t Have a Job

In: Living, Motherhood
Tired working mom at home

As a full-time working mom in America, I have spent the last six years of my life trying to work like I don’t have kids. In those same six years, I have attempted to maintain a safe and loving home for my two young sons and be a good wife.  Then a global pandemic came upon us, and I felt like I was quite literally drowning in the reality of working from the office while everyone else quarantined, trying to figure out who was going to watch the kids, and making sure their basic needs were met. I was sinking...

Keep Reading

This is Why Working Moms Are Stressed

In: Motherhood
Laundry piled up by washing machine

In case you were wondering why working moms are stressed, here are 10 reasons working mamas are STRESSED the freak out:  1. We are late to mostly everything. Especially work. You can set 15 alarms, lay out clothes the night before and meal prep until the good Lord comes back, but inevitably there will be a meltdown or someone will have to poop and next thing you know, you are running 20 minutes behind speeding down the highway answering questions about where babies come from and why the earth is round. 2. We are tired. Most nights we come home...

Keep Reading

Dear Working Mom, They Don’t Doubt Your Love

In: Kids, Motherhood

After a long day at work, around 8:30 p.m. I finally walked in the door, and my 3-year-old ran up and hugged me as she always does, but then she looked up at me and smiled and said, “Thanks for coming home, Momma.” RELATED: This is Why Working Moms Are Stressed She didn’t say: Why did you go to work? Why do you leave me almost every day? Why couldn’t you be home sooner? Why weren’t you here for dinner? You missed out on so much today. She says none of those things because those are my insecurities, not hers....

Keep Reading

Get our FREE phone wallpaper to encourage you as the new school year begins

It's bittersweet for a mother to watch her child grow—but you both are ready to soar.