Our Keepsake Journal is Here! 🎉

So, I recently made a statement on my personal page that I’m leaving Facebook and frankly, it was because I’m tired of the doom and gloom and people being nasty to each other.

In saying that, helpful tips and posts about what’s working and what isn’t is not the issue. It’s the way we’re all treating each other that I have a problem with. This virus isn’t a political issue. It shouldn’t be an us vs. them thing. It’s a virus that is making some people really sick and others not so much.

We should be taking care of ourselves all the time, yet for some reason when it’s forced on people, they panic.

And that panic has turned into uncontrollable fear. And that uncontrollable fear has us seeing the worst in humanity. Hoarding essentials, people hurting other people because they think the world is coming to end; it’s just awful that we can’t seem to support each other instead of attacking. Myself included. I’ll own that.

RELATED: To the Mom Who Feels Like it’s All Just Too Much

So after I made my Facebook post, I went to the grocery store. I needed something for dinner. Very simple.

And while I was standing in the aisle with my daughter, we were approached by an older gentleman whose name is Mark. “M-a-r-k” he would tell us later, and he lives in Kuna. By himself. And he stopped us because he wanted to know how to make a cheese sandwich. He doesn’t know how to cook, you know. And he wanted to know if he should put butter or mayonnaise on the outside of his bread to grill it. I suggested butter. Because I think mayonnaise might be gross.

As he moved closer and closer to us, we didn’t back away.

He wasn’t coughing or sneezing nor did he look ill. I offered him the one roll of toilet paper that I had in my car that I happened to pick up the other night, but he told me he had plenty because he was an “old marine” and was always prepared.

I told him my dad was in Korea. He said he was, too. And for 45 minutes, Kaitlyn and I were absolutely honored to listen to his stories of war and tales from overseas. He was careful with his language, knowing that eliminating the colorful words for Kaitlyn’s sake might dull his stories, but he told them anyway.

And then he told me that the reason he doesn’t cook is because he always goes out to eat, but they had shut down his favorite restaurant, so there he was, buying bread, cheese and White Castle microwaveable cheeseburgers.

And then, at some point, it dawned on me. He didn’t stop us because he didn’t know how to make a grilled cheese.

He stopped us because he is lonely.

He’s lonely because he can’t go to his favorite restaurant and sit in his favorite booth and talk to his favorite server.

Because fear and panic is removing not just groceries, toilet paper, and canned goods. It’s removing the very basic principles of humanity.

So, if you want my totally unsolicited opinion, wash your hands, be cautious, get what you need, and take care of your families, but by God, please, please be good to each other.

He had enough TP, but on this day, he didn’t have enough love.

I think we can all use a little more of that, don’t you?

RELATED: Kindness in the Time of Coronavirus Looks Exactly Like This

Put down your keyboards. Shove aside your “facts.” Close your opinionated mouths.

And just love each other.

Do your social distancing. Stay safe. But please don’t forget the Marks in the world who still need you to say hello.

We’re going to come out the other side of this at some point, one way or another. Let’s not destroy each other in the process.

Originally published on Facebook

So God Made a Mother book by Leslie Means

If you liked this, you'll love our book, SO GOD MADE A MOTHER available now!

Order Now

Check out our new Keepsake Companion Journal that pairs with our So God Made a Mother book!

Order Now
So God Made a Mother's Story Keepsake Journal

Diana Register

Diana Register is an international best selling author with titles that include, "Grief Life", "My Kid Is An Asshole and So Is My Dog", "The Pawn", "Saving Grace", "The Rainbow Assassin" and "Electric Man" - a book based on real-life events from her life after losing her husband to cancer.  When she's not writing books or spending time with the people she loves, she enjoys long walks to the martini bar, sleeping, avoiding laundry and chocolate chip cookies.

I Loved You to the End

In: Grief, Living
Dog on outdoor chair, color photo

As your time on this earth came close to the end, I pondered if I had given you the best life. I pondered if more treatment would be beneficial or harmful. I pondered if you knew how much you were loved and cherished As the day to say goodbye grew closer, I thought about all the good times we had. I remembered how much you loved to travel. I remembered how many times you were there for me in my times of darkness. You would just lay right next to me on the days I could not get out of...

Keep Reading

The Only Fights I Regret Are the Ones We Never Had

In: Living, Marriage
Couple at the end of a hallway fighting

You packed up your things and left last night. There are details to work out and lawyers to call, but the first step in a new journey has started. I feel equal parts sad, angry, scared, and relieved. There’s nothing left to fix. There’s no reconciliation to pursue. And I’m left thinking about the fights we never had. I came down the stairs today and adjusted the thermostat to a comfortable temperature for me. It’s a fight I didn’t consider worth having before even though I was the one living in the home 24 hours a day while you were...

Keep Reading

I Hate What the Drugs Have Done but I Love You

In: Grief, Living
Black and white image of woman sitting on floor looking away with arms covering her face

Sister, we haven’t talked in a while. We both know the reason why. Yet again, you had a choice between your family and drugs, and you chose the latter. I want you to know I still don’t hate you. What I do hate is the drugs you always seem to go back to once things get too hard for you. RELATED: Love the Addict So Hard it Hurts Speaking of hard, I won’t sugarcoat the fact that being around you when you’re actively using is so hard. Your anger, your manipulation, and your deceit are too much for me (or anyone around you) to...

Keep Reading

Give Me Friends for Real Life

In: Friendship, Living
Two friends standing at ocean's edge with arms around each other

Give me friends who see the good. Friends who enter my home and feel the warmth and love while overlooking the mess and clutter. Give me friends who pick up the phone or call back. The friends who make time to invest in our relationship.  Give me friends who are real. The friends who share the good, the beautiful, the hard, the messy, and are honest about it all. Give me friends who speak the truth. The friends who say the hard things with love. RELATED: Life is Too Short for Fake Cheese and Fake Friends Give me friends who show up. The friends who...

Keep Reading

I Asked the Questions and Mother Had the Answers. Now What?

In: Grief, Living, Loss
Older woman smiling at wedding table, black-and-white photo

No one is really ever prepared for loss. Moreover, there is no tutorial on all that comes with it. Whether you’ve lost an earring, a job, a relationship, your mind, or a relative, there is one common truth to loss. Whatever you may have lost . . . is gone. While I was pregnant with my oldest son, my mother would rub my belly with her trembling hands and answer all my questions. She had all the answers, and I listened to every single one of them. This deviated from the norm in our relationship. My mother was a stern...

Keep Reading

A Friend Gone Too Soon Leaves a Hole in Your Heart

In: Friendship, Grief, Loss
Two women hugging, color older photo

The last living memory I have of my best friend before she died was centered around a Scrabble board. One letter at a time, we searched for those seven letters that would bring us victory. Placing our last words to each other, tallying up points we didn’t know the meaning of at the time. Sharing laughter we didn’t know we’d never share again. Back in those days, we didn’t have Instagram or Facebook or Snapchat or whatever other things teenagers sneak onto their phones to capture the moments. So the memory is a bit hazy. Not because it was way...

Keep Reading

Here’s to the Saturday Mornings

In: Living, Motherhood
Baby in bouncer next to mama with coffee cup, color photo

Here’s to the Saturday mornings—the part of the week that kind of marks the seasons of our lives. I’ve had so many types of Saturdays, each just a glimpse of what life holds at the time. There were Saturdays spent sleeping in and putting off chores after a long week of school. And some Saturdays waking up on the floor in a friend’s living room after talking and prank calling all night. I’ve spent many Saturday mornings walking through superstitious pre-game routines on the way to the gym, eating just enough breakfast to fuel me for the game, but not...

Keep Reading

From a Veteran Special Needs Mom: Don’t Lose Hope

In: Living, Motherhood, Teen
Woman making heart symbol with hands

When my son was newly diagnosed with autism, I was reading everything—the good, the bad, and the ugly. So much so that to this day, I can barely handle reading anything on the subject because I overdosed so badly on it. I went through a grieving process as all families do. Grieving my expectations, hopes, and dreams. It was during this time that all hell broke loose. My child, like a lot of other people who experience autism, has a lot of other psychological and medical issues that interact with his autism. The combination of all those things led to...

Keep Reading

You Don’t Need a Pinterest-Perfect Classroom to be a Great Teacher

In: Living
Teacher with students

If you’re a new teacher, you will undoubtedly feel a lot of pressure. You will feel a lot of pressure to learn your content and the ins and outs of your school quickly. You will feel a lot of pressure to form quick relationships with your students and find the best ways to teach them, regardless of the fact that you’re still learning with them. You will simply feel a lot of pressure to be the absolute best teacher that you can be. One thing you might not expect to feel pressure for, but you undoubtedly will, is the pressure of having the Pinterest-perfect classroom....

Keep Reading

I Hope Heaven Looks like 3128 Harper Road

In: Grief, Living, Loss, Marriage
Husband and wife, posed older color photo

Jeannine Ann Eddings Morris grew up in western Kentucky as the oldest daughter of hard-working parents, who both worked at the Merritt Clothing factory. Jeannine was the oldest of 23 grandchildren who proudly belonged to John B. and Celeste Hardeman. John B. was a well-known preacher who traveled all over the South to share the gospel. Life as a child was as humble as one might expect for the 1940s. Jeannine was the oldest of four children, spanning a 13-year age range. To hear her talk, her childhood and teenage memories consisted of mostly reading every book she could find...

Keep Reading