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This is not going to be an I see you story. I mean, there is a need for those posts, but this is not it. This is for the moms of daredevil, no fear, no limits, no pain, no gain kids. The moms of the YOLO toddlers who think they are invincible. The moms who say, “I’m not calling 911 if you get hurt.” And then pray like crazy their kid does not get hurt but also wondering if an injury bigger than a Band-Aid fix would help tame their wild child’s spirit.

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We roll into parks, rocking the aviators, and turning our kids loose. Hoping they do not see playground equipment as a challenge, but we know that is exactly what they are thinking. Testing their limits. No matter how many times we say no. Kids who say “Mom, can I play on the monkey bars?” and we respond with “Are you serious? NO!”  But here we are, kids that take the word “no” and accept the challenge. Not to worry, we catch the icy stares from behind our polarized aviator lenses as our kids take on the challenge we just said no to.  

We are the moms who have Poison Control on speed dial.

Why? Because no matter how high and even after a ridiculous number of locks, our kids climb. And their lock breaking skills could rival professional criminals. And isn’t it better to already have Poison Control on speed dial than having to look up the number? Well, at least that is my opinion.

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Plus, as you are on the phone, frantic because your kid climbed in the closet and found nail polish that you had HIDDEN and drank it, the kindness and compassion that Poison Control offers is much needed. Because, at this point, we need someone to show us some compassion and offer reassurance we are not completely screwing up our kid.  And that yes, some kids just get into everything while other kids do not. 

Our kids have constant bruised shins, bumps, bruises, goose eggs, and scrapes.

And it is always when there is a big event or family pictures in less than 24 hours. Always. We ask how they got this bruise and are met with “I don’t know.” We ask, “What happened here?” and hear, “I don’t know.” We see more “they fell while running” incident reports from school that require a hug or Band-Aid than most moms. And we thank God there are teachers and teacher’s aids who are not afraid to offer that I need Mom but I’m at school and she is not here hug. You know the hug that helps stop the tears and miraculously heals the injury. 

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I may not see you in the moment of your chaos but that is probably because I am in the middle of mine. But, girl, just know I am with you in spirit. Sitting in a pediatrician’s office, less than 24 hours after a fall with (mild) concussion symptoms just trying to keep this kid from climbing chairs, exam tables, walls. I mean, we are at the pediatrician’s office and do not need an added injury here. All while texting my best mom friends with an SOS text of “MOM’S NIGHT MUST HAPPEN.” And making sure that it comes to fruition. 

So, to my daredevil moms, you are rocking the stamina and grit it takes to keep up with your YOLO kids.

And if you feel alone, not to worry, I feel you while I wrangle three kids of my own. And to the moms who are realizing their kids are the YOLO kids, welcome to the aviator club! We got your back. 

Originally published on the author’s Instagram page

Julie Rozum

Julie is a SAHM to three sweet, adorable, daredevil kids, who cause more gray hair than she ever thought possible.  Julie is married, to her firefighter husband and both share a wicked sense of humor.  Julie runs the best friend, no filter, Instagram account @rootedinchaosandgrace, (https://www.instagram.com/rootedinchaosandgrace/).

In Defense of the Wild Child

In: Kids, Motherhood
In Defense of the Wild Child www.herviewfromhome.com

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